September 13, 2016

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I am re-naming my Bonus Reads Queue Cutters! which better reflects them here on my blog. These are books for which I interrupt regularly scheduled programming reading for various short-term reasons—a friend’s book I want to review promptly, a book being studied in a writing book or webinar, or something new that just can’t wait!

Brain On Fire: My Month of Madness by Susannah Cahalan

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I read this book as part of a webinar offered by Brooke Warner and Linda Joy Myers: How To Write a Memoir That Changes Lives/What Made Brain On Fire a Best-Selling Memoir?

This book is a fierce, fascinating story about the author’s rare auto-immune disease that sent her spiraling into what seemed like madness. With the help of a brilliant, dedicated physician, the unwavering support of her family, and her own steel will, the author not only recovers but thrives, ultimately using her experience to advocate for others trapped in a diagnostic quagmire.  

I loved the book, and Brooke and Linda Joy’s initial discussion of it, and can’t wait for the next four weeks of its study, which you can register for here.

 

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child by J.K. Rowling, Jack Thorne, and John Tiffany

I was #33 in the library queue when a friend gave me her Barnes & Noble midnight release party copy. Not just any friend—Moaning Myrtle!

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This is what first prize looks like! 

I’ve read all the Harry Potter books, and though I don’t share the, shall we say, obsession, that many people feel, I loved the first (Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone) and seventh (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows) books, and really liked the five in between.

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Reading this Harry Potter book feels different, obviously, than the previous seven, as it is written as a play. I liked seeing how much can be done using (almost) only dialogue, and I liked how it felt like slipping right back into the world of characters I—along with the rest of the world—came to know and love so well. I am not, however, a fan of time travel, which was central to this book’s plot so that detracted a bit for me. Still, it’s a fun, must-read book for the Harry Potter world, which let’s face it, along with Frozen, we’re all just living in.

I would love to see the actual play, and can’t imagine how they pull off all that magic on stage!

Thanks, Myrtle Tori! 

LP